The making of memory in the Middle Ages
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The making of memory in the Middle Ages

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Published by Brill in Leiden, Boston .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Civilization, Medieval,
  • Middle Ages,
  • Memory -- Social aspects -- Europe -- History -- To 1500,
  • Collective memory -- Europe -- History -- To 1500,
  • Literature, Medieval -- History and criticism,
  • Narration (Rhetoric) -- History -- To 1500,
  • Europe -- Social conditions -- To 1492,
  • Europe -- Intellectual life,
  • Europe -- Social life and customs

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Statementedited by Lucie Doležalová.
SeriesLater medieval Europe -- v. 4
ContributionsDoležalová, Lucie.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsCB353 .M33 2009
The Physical Object
Paginationp. cm.
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL23643327M
ISBN 109789004179257
LC Control Number2009029440

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In his new book, The Making and Unmaking of a Saint: Hagiography and Memory in the Cult of Gerald of Aurillac, Mathew Kuefler describes the rise and fall of a Medieval Saint. What on the surface may seem to be an exploration of a rather insignificant saint, is 5/5(1). The Making of Memory in the Middle Ages. Series: Later Medieval Europe, Volume: 4. Editor: Lucie Doležalová. Memory in the Middle Ages has received particular attention in recent decades; yet; the topic remains difficult to grasp and the research on it rather fragmented. The Making of Memory in the Middle Ages. Mary Carruthers's classic study of the training and uses of memory in European cultures during the Middle Ages has fundamentally changed the way scholars understand medieval culture. This fully revised and updated second edition considers afresh all the material and conclusions of the by:

  The Making of Memory in the Middle Ages Series: Later Medieval Europe, Volume: 4Cited by: 1. The Making of the Middle Ages is a study of the period to Before Southern wrote this book in , the period has traditionally been called the High Middle Ages or the "Renaissance of the 12th Century". However Southern sees it as more than a Renaissance (usually thought of as a period of *re* discovery of classical texts and ideas), Cited by:   Memory, Meditation And Preaching: A Fifteenth-Century Memory Machine In Central Europe (The Text Nota Hanc Figuram Composuerunt Doctores / Pro Aliquali Intelligentia) The Staging Of Memory: Ars Memorativa And The Spectacle Of Imagination In Late Medieval Preaching In PolandCited by: 1. The Making of a Medieval Book explores the materials and techniques used to create the lavishly illuminated manuscripts produced in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. The images in these handwritten texts are called illuminations because of the radiant glow created by the gold, silver, and other colors.

The book may feel loose and swivel rather easily, and this can be tightened up (as it was in the later Middle Ages) by sewing on stout headbands along the top and bottom edge of the spine. The boards of medieval manuscripts were generally made of wood.   Part of the Brill series on Later Medieval Europe, The Making of Memory in the Middle Ages taps into the formative theoretical work of influential memory scholars such as Janet Coleman, Mary Carruthers, and Patrick Geary. The result is a rich survey of both the variety of research currently underway in the field, and of the wide range of uses to which the study of . Revisiting Memory In The Middle Ages (Introduction) Communal Memory Of The Distributed Author: Applicability Of The Connectionist Model Of Memory To The Study Of Traditional Narratives Writing The Memory Of The Virtues And Vices . The art of memory was most importantly associated in the Middle Ages with composition, and those who practiced the craft used it to make new prayers, sermons, pictures, and music. The mixing of visual and verbal media was commonplace throughout medieval cultures: pictures contained visual puns, words were often verbal paintings, and both were used equally as .